The first of the 24th Annual Dick Smyser Community Lecture Series will be

Understanding Photosynthesis to Improve Crop Productivity

Krishna Niyogi
Photosynthesis

Krishna Niyogi, a 1982 Oak Ridge High School graduate who was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2016, will give a virtual talk on Wednesday, June 23, on “Understanding photosynthesis to improve crop productivity.” He will deliver the Dick Smyser Community Lecture at 7:00 p.m., which is open to the public and sponsored by Friends of Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Smyser was the first editor of The Oak Ridger and an active member of FORNL.You can access the Zoom link by clicking on the talk title on the homepage of the fornl.org website.

News article about the talk: ORHS grad's research might boost food production (oakridger.com)

According to the https://niyogilab.berkeley.edu/ website, “the Niyogi Lab uses a wide array of experimental organisms (cyanobacteria, eukaryotic algae, and plants) and interdisciplinary approaches to investigate fundamental questions about the assembly, regulation, and dynamics of photosynthesis. Current lab members study the biosynthesis and function of photosynthetic pigments, assembly and repair of photosynthetic reaction centers, structure and dynamics of the photosynthetic membrane, mechanisms involved in sensing excess light, singlet oxygen signaling, transcriptional regulation of photosynthesis and photoprotection by light and carbon, and regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting in saturating light. By comparing how photosynthesis works in diverse organisms, we hope to uncover general design principles of natural photosynthesis as well as unique adaptations to different environments.”

Krishna Niyogi
1982 Oak Ridge High School graduate
Elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2016
.

Professor in the Department of Plant and Microbial Biology
at the University of California at Berkeley
Faculty Scientist in the Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
.

 

Krishna Niyogi, a 1982 Oak Ridge High School graduate who was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2016, will give a virtual talk on Wednesday, June 23, on “Understanding photosynthesis to improve crop productivity.” His community lecture at 7:00 p.m., which is open to the public, is sponsored by Friends of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. You can access the Zoom link by clicking on the talk title on the home page of the www.fornl.org website.

Niyogi is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, a professor in the Department of Plant and Microbial Biology at the University of California at Berkeley and a faculty scientist in the Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

   The Niyogi Lab studies photosynthetic energy conversion and its regulation in algae and plants. The lab’s long-term research goals are to understand how photosynthesis works, how it is regulated, and how it might be improved to help meet the world's needs for food and fuel.
   Niyogi discovered the genetic mechanisms by which green plants cope with receiving excessive sunlight. He found that plants have a line of defense (non-photochemical quenching, or NPQ) that enables them to release the extra light energy as heat. In 2001, Niyogi received the Melvin Calvin Award from the International Society of Photosynthesis Research in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the understanding of mechanisms of “photoprotection” in plants and algae.

   Niyogi holds a B.A. degree in biology from Johns Hopkins University and a Ph.D. degree in biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also performed research at the Carnegie Institution. 

   Kris Niyogi is the son of the late Salil Niyogi and Audrey Stevens, both scientists in ORNL’s old Biology Division. His mother was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1998 for independently demonstrating the synthesis of RNA in E. coli bacterial cells by an enzyme called RNA polymerase.

Krishna Niyogi
According to the https://niyogilab.berkeley.edu/ website, “the Niyogi Lab uses a wide array of experimental organisms (cyanobacteria, eukaryotic algae, and plants) and interdisciplinary approaches to investigate fundamental questions about the assembly, regulation, and dynamics of photosynthesis. Current lab members study the biosynthesis and function of photosynthetic pigments, assembly and repair of photosynthetic reaction centers, structure and dynamics of the photosynthetic membrane, mechanisms involved in sensing excess light, singlet oxygen signaling, transcriptional regulation of photosynthesis and photoprotection by light and carbon, and regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting in saturating light. By comparing how photosynthesis works in diverse organisms, we hope to uncover general design principles of natural photosynthesis as well as unique adaptations to different environments.”
    For more information on Kris Niyogi and his parents, please visit

https://www.oakridger.com/news/20170215/historically-speaking-mother-son-both-elected-to-national-academy-of-sciences
 

The meeting will be remote via Zoom!
7:00 pm, Wednesday, June 23rd, 2021


Because you are using the provided link, you do not need to enter a password.
If this is your first time on Zoom, after clicking the link, you will be asked to download the Zoom app.  You may do this any time prior to the meeting.
After the Zoom app has been downloaded, click on the link above to enter the meeting.
Things to know.
You can control your mute by a button on your image.  During the presentation, please keep yourself on mute.
There are Gallery View and Speaker View options.  Use Gallery View to see all the attendees.  Use Speaker View to see the speaker and the presentation material.
Questions may be asked using the ‘Chat’ option.  There is ‘Chat’ icon at the bottom of the screen.  If you have a question, click this icon, and type in the question.  Questions will be addressed at the end of the presentation.
Zoom works on laptops as well on tablets and phones, but a bit differently.  If you have questions related to these options, please look for information at
https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/categories/200101697-Getting-Started

We hope to SEE you at the meeting!

John E. Gunning

Dr. John E. Gunning

President
Friends of ORNL